Do you speak the Croatian language?

It is nice to learn a few words from the local language when travelling.

Usually, it’s how to say hello, thank you and goodbye.

HI THERE!

Dubrovnik Walking Tours Natasha

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Many times I had to explain that the Croatian language is not Russian and that we cannot understand each other. But what are the most interesting and difficult parts of the Croatian language?

Diacritics

What has the letter C ever done to you guys??

I got this gem of a question by a fellow Croatian whose family has been living in the USA for 3 generations now. It refers to our love for diacritic marks and confusion that one feels when explained that Č, Ć, and C are very different things. It’s the same with Z and Ž, S and Š. If you haven’t lost the will to learn the Croatian language by now, you will: D and Đ, the lovechild of D and Ž – DŽ, and last but not the least – LJ.

Btw. the Croatian alphabet has only 30 letters (not 300 as it may seem!).

Consonants

There are just too many of them, and many people struggle with pronunciation. Many of my guests said that they would like to try Croatian beer and want to know which one is good. And then I say Karlovačko, Ožujsko, Grička vještica :insert confused English speaking soul here: Poor people usually just end up saying simply „Draught beer, please“.

Dialects

The Croatian language has many of them. Sometimes the two Croats cannot understand each other and constantly struggle with dialectal and words from the standard language. My favorite example is the Brittish journalist who moved to Dubrovnik when he married a local lady. In one of his columns, he wrote about his first trip to the capital, Zagreb. Proud of his Croatian he entered into fast food and asked for a hamburger. Problem? The poor man said he wanted pomadora and not kukumari in it – he used dialectal words from Dubrovnik region for tomato and cucumber. So be careful, you may be learning to speak dialect and not standard Croatian language!

But despite all of those problems and weird letters, it is still possible to learn Croatian. We do appreciate the effort and we don’t make fun of people’s mistakes because we know how hard it is. Let me know if you are willing to learn some phrases during one of my tours, I’d be happy to teach you. No extra charge, of course! 🙂

 

Do you speak the Croatian language

It is nice to learn a few words from the local language when travelling. Usually, it’s how to say hello, thank you and goodbye.

Many times I had to explain that the Croatian language is not Russian and that we cannot understand each other. But what are the most interesting and difficult parts of the Croatian language?

Diacritics

What has the letter C ever done to you guys??

I got this gem of a question by a fellow Croatian whose family has been living in the USA for 3 generations now. It refers to our love for diacritic marks and confusion that one feels when explained that Č, Ć, and C are very different things. It’s the same with Z and Ž, S and Š. If you haven’t lost the will to learn the Croatian language by now, you will: D and Đ, the lovechild of D and Ž – DŽ, and last but not the least – LJ.

Btw. the Croatian alphabet has only 30 letters (not 300 as it may seem!).

Consonants

There are just too many of them, and many people struggle with pronunciation. Many of my guests said that they would like to try Croatian beer and want to know which one is good. And then I say Karlovačko, Ožujsko, Grička vještica :insert confused English speaking soul here: Poor people usually just end up saying simply „Draught beer, please“.

Dialects

The Croatian language has many of them. Sometimes the two Croats cannot understand each other and constantly struggle with dialectal and words from the standard language. My favorite example is the Brittish journalist who moved to Dubrovnik when he married a local lady. In one of his columns, he wrote about his first trip to the capital, Zagreb. Proud of his Croatian he entered into fast food and asked for a hamburger. Problem? The poor man said he wanted pomadora and not kukumari in it – he used dialectal words from Dubrovnik region for tomato and cucumber. So be careful, you may be learning to speak dialect and not standard Croatian language!

But despite all of those problems and weird letters, it is still possible to learn Croatian. We do appreciate the effort and we don’t make fun of people’s mistakes because we know how hard it is. Let me know if you are willing to learn some phrases during one of my tours, I’d be happy to teach you. No extra charge, of course!

 

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